krissiikisses:

This book teaches black, Afro-descendent, Afro-Latina, and/or Garifuna girls how to positively describe different hair types instead of using the term “bad hair”. Fun illustrations were created to help describe different types of hair and hairstyles. This book was created to empower little girls so they can embrace and love their beautiful natural hair. This book calls for all of us to work as equal partners to encourage our girls by using proper terminology to describe their hair which is directly linked to their essence and self-esteem.

@Nopelomalo

(via wocinsolidarity)

unhistorical:

Rink’s first celebration of his birthday in his adopted city of San Francisco took place on June 27th, 1969—and was interrupted by a phone call from a friend in Greenwich Village relating the Stonewall riots in real time. After getting caught up in the then-nascent LGBT political movement, Rink turned his focus to the rich fabric of queer social and political life, chronicling San Francisco’s seismic self-transformation into the queerest city in the world in the space of a decade. The great historical value of Rink’s work is the nearly day by day chronicling of that process of transformation, the gradual and occasionally violent birthing of the San Francisco we know today. 

Rink Foto

(via angrywocunited)

deepstarss:

"you’re not asian! you’re indian/pakistani/bengali/other"

bruh does the asian map look like this to you:

image

(via angrywocunited)

Things To Remember

wittyandcharming:

  • Don’t be angry at yourself when anxiety/depression flares up. It isn’t your fault and no one blames you and if they do they’re pieces of shit.
  • Don’t orbit around your perceived value so much. You’re not the sum total of what you produce.
  • Don’t let yourself wonder why people love you. That’s not how it works. There are not stark, individual reasons that a person can enumerate about why they love you. It’s the entire, unique combination of what and who you are.

(via rainingdogs)

Accept who you are; and revel in it.

Mitch Albom, Tuesdays With Morrie (via misswallflower)

In 1306 an Ethiopian delegation came to Europe to seek an alliance with the “King of the Spains” against the Moslems. King Anfós IV of Aragon considered arranging a double marriage with the Negus of Ethiopia in 1428. And the Portuguese sent Pedro de Corvilhao to Ethiopia in 1487 on a similar mission.

Meanwhile the actual living experience of blacks in Europe appeared to be marked by smooth integration into European society, with the role of lower-class blacks determined very much by that of their masters or employers. The 140,000 slaves imported into Europe from Africa between 1450 and 1505 were a welcome new labor force in the wake of the Bubonic Plague.

On the whole, the blacks in Christian Iberia were not limited to servile roles; but they were also not influential as a group. The new slave population in Portugal worked in agriculture and fishing. Free blacks living in Loulé and Lagos in the southern edge of Portugal owned houses and worked as day laborers, midwives, bakers, and servants. Most were domestic servants, laborers (including those on ships and river craft), and petty tradesmen.

Some free blacks, especially women, became innkeepers. Blacks in Spain served as stevedores, factory workers, farm laborers, footmen, coachmen, and butlers. Male and female domestics apparently lived well compared to other lower-class people. Slaves could work in all the crafts, but could not join the guilds.

A few Africans active in the Americas during the early Iberian expansion were among returnees to Portugal and Spain from America and Africa from the 16th to the 18th centuries. These included free mulatto students, clerics, free and slave household servants, sailors, and some who attained gentlemen’s status. The use of many black women slaves as domestics and concubines led to mulatto offspring who received favored treatment, and in some instances, attained middle-class and even aristocratic status.

Problems in Studying the Role of Blacks in Europe by Allison Blakeley via Historians.org, American Historical Association (via medievalpoc)

pankurios-templeovarts:

Classic illustrations by the maestro John Albert Bauer (1882-1918).

(via hicockalorum)

blastedheath:

Zhao Bo (Chinese, b. 1984), Lost in the Garden of Eden (Astronaut No. 2), 2011. Oil on canvas, 67 x 59 in.

blastedheath:

John Jurayj (American, b. 1968), Untitled (Cedars of Lebanon Series, 1968, #17), 2013. Oil on linen, 213.5 x 188 cm.

pizzaandpixels:

A bunch of scribbly shit from today. And a quick BH6 study. 

manufactoriel:

Aluad Deng by François Visser

(via chaoticclassicism)

did-you-kno:

If your storage limit is pretty crummy, you can buy flash drives shaped like little pieces of toast, and a USB toaster hub to keep them warm. Source

did-you-kno:

Psychologists say that “trying not to think about it” will only make things worse because suppressed thoughts, cravings, or emotions fight back and become stronger. A more successful method is to accept these feelings and find other distractions. Source

readmyquiet:

Yaaaaaaaaaaas Raven!!! 😩😍😍😍😍😍😍😍😍😍😍✨🙌

(via angrywocunited)

cultureincart:

Abstract Graphs

The Traditional Windows of China

(via yellow--ranger)